Why Pope Francis’ World Day of Peace Message is Such a Breakthrough

That Pope Francis consciously chose “nonviolence” as the theme of his message to the world on New Year ’s Day, 2017, is in itself a powerful fact. The Pope unabashedly pointed out that “(Jesus)… taught his disciples to love their enemies and to turn the other cheek. … Jesus marked out the path of nonviolence. He walked that path to the very end, to the cross.”

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Do Not Resist One Who Is Evil: Questioning Walter Wink’s Interpretation of Mt 5:38-41

Jesus’ point in Mt 5:38-42 appears to be that we are not to retaliate for evil done to us, and when someone imposes on us, we are to accept the imposition and even go beyond the minimum demanded.

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Highlights

Is the Just War Tradition Compatible with the New Testament?

Can anyone seriously imagine Jesus pulling out a sword and hacking and thrusting his way through the stone throwers? The notion that Christians can wage war as long as they kill with love for the enemy in their hearts is as foreign to the New Testament as it is to reason and experience.

The 2017 World Day of Peace Message: Our Magna Carta

Pope Francis’s exhortation on January 1st, 2017, the “World Day of Peace” gives us hope for what is possible. Pope Francis shows us how Jesus lived in violent times and yet he never took part in that violence, but he promoted peace even to his death. In this New Year of 2017 we remain committed to this movement of nonviolence in our lives and in all that we do.

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Features

Living Peace in Universal Kinship: A Franciscan Invitation

By Mary Liepold, Pax Christi Metro DC-Baltimore. October 4 was the Feast of St. Francis, patron of ecology and celibate father of the ever-green, 800-year-old Franciscan movement with all its exuberant shoots and branches.

Prayer to St. Francis

By Art Laffin
St. Francis, most faithful disciple of Jesus, holy one of the poor, servant of the outcasts, lover of creation, you who bore the sacred stigmata of Jesus, thank you for showing everyone–past and present–how much God loves us and that we are all children of the same Creator.

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